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The Ewing Public Schools Celebrate Black History Month!

The Ewing Schools Celebrate Black History Month!

 

With February coming to an end, the “Good News” staff took a look back at some of the neat events and activities that took place in our schools to honor and celebrate Black History Month.

 

We begin with Antheil Elementary School, where student representatives from each 3rd, 4th and 5th grade class presented over the PA system highlighting various civil rights activists and leaders in the African-American community. Teachers then went on to use this information as a teaching tool, by visiting our Black History Month bulletin board which spotlighted all 18 of our activists and provided information about them. Students also heard messages of diversity and acceptance over the morning announcements during the week of Dr. Martin Luther King's Birthday. Teachers then used Morning Meeting time to teach and reflect on these themes with their class.

 

 Antheil           Antheil

        

Over past the golf course at Lore School, the students participated in an assembly titled Bantaba: The Circle of Celebration. The high energy performance by artists The Seventh Principle helped students to develop an understanding of West African cultures, especially how dance and music are infused into elements of everyday life in West African communities.  Students learned about the history of African dance and musicianship, played the Djembe, and danced along with the artists. “It was a wonderful day, and I want to thank the Lore Parent Association for providing this learning opportunity for our students,” Principal Kelly Kawalek stated.  

 

Taking a quick look into a classroom, students in Mrs. Schiavoni's 2nd grade class spent the month of February researching famous  African-Americans.  The students navigated their way through nonfiction books and researched websites to gather information that was compiled into individual books that showcased their hard work. Students recorded notes, wrote paragraphs, and created their own books to honor African-American heroes.

 

 

Lore  

 

Lore

 

 

Lore

 

The Parkway School conducted a Pep Rally on February 5th where the 5th grade band showcased their musical acumen and Mr. Thomas (4th grade teacher) and his drum corps treated the students to their creative freestyle on the djembe drums.  In music class students learned about a variety of Swahili songs and studied African American musicians in the United States.  In the media center, Parkway students had the opportunity to read and study African American biographies.

 

 

Parkway

 

On Mondays during February, Parkway students were greeted by the Djembe drum corps and on Fridays a different 5th grade class sang,  “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing” as part of the traveling morning announcements.  The hallways of the building are covered with the written efforts of student reports, kindergarten through fifth, about famous African-Americans.

 

 

Parkway

 

 

At Fisher Middle School, in recognition of Black History Month, the student council created a bulletin board with quotes from notable figures and sponsored our first ever Black History Month poetry contest.  Students in all three grades were encouraged to enter their unique creative works.  The winners of the contest had their poems read aloud to the entire student body during morning announcements. 

 

 

FMS

 

 

Pictures of the bulletin board and poems follow:

 

FMS Peom

 

FMS Peom

 

 

Finally, at Ewing High School, on February 21st, EHS students in African American Literature, African American History, and Women’s Studies classes had the privilege of attending New Jersey Department of Education’s inaugural celebration of Black History Month.  The program, titled “Breaking Barriers Through Education”, included speeches from Education Commissioner Lamont Repollet, Lt. Governor Shelia Brown, and former Obama administration official Rashan Prailow, as well as performances from New Jersey high schools. Students were encouraged to reflect upon the contributions of African Americans to all facets of life in the United States, from the arts to science and education. “It was a wonderful experience,” EHS Assistant Superintendent Karen Benton stated, “We are appreciative of the efforts of the Department of Education. Ewing students enjoyed the program and look forward to performing in next year’s celebration!”

 

 

EHS